Home Forums General Applying for French nationality

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  • #754

    Anonymous
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    I made a passing comment about this on my topic ‘Interesting hobbies’, and it led to an exchange of comments which had nothing to do with the original posting.

    I thought it deserved a place of its own with an appropriate heading, so I have copied part of my reply here.

    You have to be resident for a least 5 years. If you are under 60 you must produce a certificate from an approved training establishment showing that you have sufficient knowledge of the language – ie attend a course and pass an exam – over 60 you are exempt but must show at the interview that you have sufficient knowledge of the language, as well as an appreciation of the history and culture of France. That is set out in a livret du citoyen which you can download as a PDF document.

    Have a look at https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F2213 for details, including a link for the livret du citoyen, and https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/R16995 to download the application form and an information sheet which sets out the documents you must produce – loads of them. If you would like to talk about it in greater detail, email me.

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    #756

    WCB
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    well with the threat of Brexit looming, no doubt many British expats must be mulling over if they need to go this route.

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    #760

    Anonymous
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    thankyou, John Doe,very informative…food for thought,I agree that many people may consider trying for French nationality because of a brexit.
    I,ve thought about it for a long time,I,m English,my husband is German ,we live in France ..makes me European ….even though the common market is a mixed blessing.
    I do not see a day when I would want to go back to England ….I love visiting …but am always happy to be home….home being where my husband and house is!
    serious thoughts …..

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    #761

    WCB
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    I agree with @pitterpatter

    I have worked all over the world for the last 25 Years, and finally chose to settle in France, but do consider myself “European” far more than British or English.
    TBH I am not that worried about the In/Out arguments at this stage, as no doubt if the UK do vote out, it will take some years to organise the exit, giving us plenty of time to make the appropriate arrangements, and by that time I will have met the requirements to make it easier (e.g. be of retirement age, and have been here long enough)

    my work still takes me back to the UK at least once a quarter, but I still do not miss it on a day to day basis.

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    #765

    Anonymous
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    One day it looks out next day it looks in, depending on which paper you read. It takes a minimum of two years to get out, during which time UK’s EU membership carries on as normal, it won’t be done and dusted in two years so could take between five to ten years, during which time UK will still be regarded as a member, but if it’s anything like Turkey trying to join it could thirty years to negotiate leaving, but the being able to stay in France permanently applies to anyone who has been here legally for more than five years, only difference would be we would need a carte sejour, which is what we had when we first arrived here. I have a couple of years before I hit sixty, I might just start working a bit harder on my French just in case, but one question I have is do you become 100% French national or have dual nationality?.

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    #768

    WCB
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    Bodiddly
    I think that would be up to you

    becoming a french national would not stop you also being a British national, unless you chose to surrender your nationality (at least as far as I know)

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    #769

    Anonymous
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    WestCountryBoy is right. I have both nationalities now.

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    #773

    Anonymous
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    Brexit in itself is not sufficient reason. You must have a feeling for the country and the people. From my earliest days here when I slept on rush matting on the floor in front of an open fire in the middle of a bitter cold winter, I knew this was my home. When I returned from the UK on a furniture run or other visit, as I drove through the nearby town I felt ‘I’m almost home’.

    In those days the thought of applying for nationality never crossed my mind.

    When I decided to apply two years ago, the referendum and the possibility of Brexit had not been considered by anyone. I applied because it meant something to me. And as I have said elsewhere, the day the letter arrived from the Ministère de l’Intérieur I could not have been happier.

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    #842

    helenct61
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    John Doe, we are awaiting with impatience our letter from the ministère de l’intérieur, we applied in the middle of last year because we’re proud to be here, because we intend staying (although never say never), and honestly are now concerned that brexit (or the threat of) may influence decisions.
    All the boxes have been ticked, including the interview at the prefecture. Just waiting to hear now. Honestly, I would be gutted if we didn’t get it as If I have the choice then I would like to not be a foreigner in my chosen country

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    #845

    Anonymous
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    Hi Helen, and good luck with your application. I hope the Brexit referendum won’t affect you.

    Don’t hold your breath. I waited 17 months from the date of my interview to receiving my letter. There was one major holdup which was not anticipated. I was divorced many years ago, and produced divorce decree with the initial papers as required. Some months later I was asked to produce my ex’s birth certificate. This is not one of the documents listed on any papers or websites and was not asked for at the interview. Why it was needed I don’t know.

    This is where it became complicated. As she had been married and divorced previously I never knew her maiden name. She reverted to her parents name after her first divorce, but she was born before her parents married (quite a sin back in those days!), and her new father was not her natural father and never legally adopted her, so the name on her birth certificate was her mother’s maiden name, and I had no idea what that was.

    This is where a link on the government’s https://www.gov.uk/research-family-history website led me to an independent charitable website http://www.freebmd.org.uk/ (a free site as suggested by the name) where I was able to find her parents marriage details including her mother’s maiden name, and hence her own maiden name.

    If you think this sounds complicated, there were a couple of further twists and turns along the way which I won’t go into. But I got there within a few hours on the internet, applied for a copy birth certificate, and sent it to the préfecture.

    That was about 7 months after my interview, and I don’t know to what extend it slowed my application.

    The reason I am posting this is to suggest that if either of you have previously divorced, have a word with your préfecture to see if they need a previous spouse’s birth certificate, and maybe spend a few pounds to get it anyway just in case the same problem arises.

    Bon chance!

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    #894

    helenct61
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    Wow John Doe, what a tale! Fortunately we have no such complication in our life. Mind you a fonctionaire might find another peculiar one that we’re as yet unaware of!
    The lady at the prefecture said that we would know before the end of the year, but we’re not holding our breath!

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    #906

    Anonymous
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    Helen, if my application took 17 months with the holdup I described, I can’t see why yours should take any longer without that complication.

    Although the letter I received confirmed that I am now a citizen as from the date shown, and I have downloaded the Journal Officiel in which I am named, the letter said that I will have to wait approximately 6 months before I am invited to the préfecture for the presentation of the relevant documents which will allow me to request my carte d’identité and passeport. In the meantime I have shown the letter to CPAM so that I am no longer treated as a foreigner, as letters and statements from them in the past said enquiries should be addressed to ‘Assures Migrants’. I am no longer a migrant.

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