Home Forums General Property Purchase in France

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Nick 2 weeks, 3 days ago.

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  • #88780

    Nick
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    August 29, 2018

    Hi and Seasons Greetings to you all,

    Is there a right way or a wrong way to purchase a property in France? I have heard of the inheritance  tax and I do not want to place my children in a precarious position in the future so wanted to know if there is a particular way that favours a foreigner to purchase a property in France.

    Thank you

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    #88797

    caxton
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    June 25, 2016

    Have you googled “buying property in France.”
    There are a number of articles some of which have a brexit update which is something those of us already here would not have had to deal with. So I suggest you start there.

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    #88801

    Chapeau rouge
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    April 24, 2016

    Hello.  Have no idea as to what are your thoughts on a  house purchase and the best way to protect your children.  However, best advice I can offer (and we have bought and sold lots since coming to France almost 20 years ago) is to be fore-armed! Sit down and make some notes on exactly what you want, questions you need to ask, how and in whose name/s the property will be bought etc.,  Then find yourself either a bi-lingual Notaire (someone who is up-to-date with French property law and finance and how this may affect you as a British person buying here). You may be aware that Notaires in France are surprisingly more like Tax Collectors for the Government than Solicitors. They don’t make lots of enquiries on your behalf and are generally not interested  in the nuts and bolts, writing to you or answering too many questions.  It’s important that they not only speak English but are able to properly explain in English how the law will work for you and your family and exactly what your options are!  Or, perhaps have a conversation with one of the many English firms of lawyers who advertise in, for example, The Connection.  Speak to someone and satisfy yourself that they will be prepared to advise and put your mind at rest on the most important legal aspects and clarify what are your options.   Once you have chosen someone who can advise you properly, it will then be up to you to decide whether you let them carry on and deal with the conveyancing of the property to you, or whether you will share  a Notaire with the seller (a more usual route) who will then deal with the sale and purchase for both of you.

    Lots of people/us can give you the benefit  of  good and bad experiences, but you should try to find the best professional advice on how things will work best for you and your family and who can pull all the advice together so that you are not anxious about the process.  The Estate Agent (who normally prepares the contract) will probably try to convince you that there is a one-size-fits-all way of buying.  There’s not – hence your needing to be better prepared before you start the process.   Good luck with it all and all good wishes for the New Year!

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    #88821

    Nick
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    Thanks for the replies, very useful advice…

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    #88829

    crabtree
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    August 26, 2017

    There is no right or wrong way to buy a house in France It all depends on your circumstances Firstly you need to understand French inheritance law ie who gets what when you die eg you cannot disinherit children including children of previous relationships However at present you can make a declaration in France stating that you would like your estate IN FRANCE dealt with  in accordance with UK law.But whether or not this can continue after Brexit is anybody’s guess You should note that all deaths are referred to a notaire to sort out division of the estate etc so you need to develop a good relationship from the word go so that the notaire can advise you of your options.In addition there are various UK firms who can advise you In respect of the tax rates children currently receive a €100 000 tax free allowance in France other relatives get less THis means that if you have several children the house will be split equally amongst them You do not mention a spouse or partner but be aware that if you are not married then there is a possibility that tax at 60% may be levied on your partner but there are ways of mitigating this YOu need to get advice from a professional frankly

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    #88953

    Nick
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    August 29, 2018

    Thank you crabtree for your reply…

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