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  • #11035
    Anonymous
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    A suggestion for all the ‘United In’ sites.

    That is a section of the forum drop down menu be dedicated to The French Language -to help those of us who are not yet bilingual, post the odd query and get to grips with the quirks of usage, particularly local ones. It seems strange that a forum for expats should not have some sort of permanent discussion page about the language of the country we live in.

    Dictionaries and online translate can hinder more than help as I frequently discover  :scratch:

    As ‘Inactifs’,  living ‘out of town’, we don’t come into contact with as many French people as we would like and have yet to find a suitable French class for our needs, but that doesn’t mean that we don’t want or need to learn French. Our lovely French neighbours speak not one word of English (and why should they?), but we cannot understand one word of what they say and they seem to have trouble understanding our limited French(other French people do understand us). I now know, from a visiting French professional, that they all have a very strong local accent and use local words. I suspect I was taught Parisiennne French at school.

    As a start, can someone please tell me what a ‘bourse’ is? I know it’s a stock exchange :wacko: , but what is a bourse when listed in a book along with vide greniers, puces, brocantes, and foires a tout-all of which I understand.

    #11039
    Jack
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    April 3, 2016

    My dictionary has it as ‘a sale of numismatic or philatelic items on tables’

    #11055
    Katsura
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    August 2, 2016

    Test – to see if this posts because I’ve lost two posts responding to the OP already – they just vanished after I clicked the submit button…

     

    Okay, so that posted. I’ll try one more time…

     

    Bourse in the OP’s context just means trade or exchange. So a bourse aux vêtements is an ‘exchange’ of clothing and what I’d probably refer to in the UK as a jumble sale for clothes.

    Best site for translation I’ve found – because it gives actual usage contexts – is

    http://www.linguee.fr/

    Enter bourse and you’ll not only get definitions but if you scroll down, you get lots of usage examples and their translation. Bear in mind that some of the usage is French-Canadian, though, which can be slightly different to ‘pure’ French. From Linguee I see that bourse often means ‘grant’… I’ve always used subvention for grant. But I suppose subvention has subsidy overtones and that’s not always strictly accurate.

    I also found another definition for bourses that I’d not seen before… :wacko:

    #11061
    Anonymous
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    Strange that you should ask that because Mortain will be holding their winter Bourse au Vêtements next week in COSEC. Although the word is usually used to describe a stock exchange or commodity market, the Mortain event is simply a sale of second hand clothes. So there you have it – it’s a sale or a market. I called in to the last one in Mortain (I thing they have them twice a year) to get an idea of what is sold and at what prices as I have a vast amount of clothes (including bikers gear) of my late brothers to dispose of. I will not get round to wearing most of them if I live to be 100. I did post an advert in classifieds on UiN under the heading CLOTHING PLUS BIKING GEAR FOR SALE, but got no response. I am currently preparing the list of items and tags to be attached to them.

    Bourse can also mean a purse, but I don’t have one of them.

    I agree that we should all improve our French. I have the large Robert/Collins dictionary as well as the pocket one, but most of the time I rely on my Franklin electronic translator. It is much quicker and usually tells me what I want to know. I rarely use online translators.

    It is true that locals, especially the older ones speak patois or use words that are not used throughout France.

    #11075
    Katsura
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    August 2, 2016

    What sort of stuff is sold at the Mortain bourse aux vêtements, John? I’m looking for interesting bits of fabric and woollens that I can turn into something else but it’s only worth buying stuff if it is adequate quality and well-priced. If it’s all baby and toddler clothes, for eg, I’m not so interested.

    Have you tried advertising your biker kit on leboncoin? You might find a more relevant market for the items on there.

    #11163
    Anonymous
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    Many thanks all for the explanations of what ‘bourse‘ may mean.

    I wonder what I will find in Avranches next Saturday where they have a ‘Bourse automne-hiver‘ at the Salle Victor Hugo. No mention of vetements, timbre or anything else. Perhaps it is a printing error. I was wondering if it were merely an exhibition, rather than a ‘sale of autumn winter’? :unsure:

     

    #11168
    Pauline Smith
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    March 27, 2016

    http://bourse-aux-vetements.over-blog.com/2016/09/bourse-aux-vetements-hiver-2016.html

    I think you’ll find autumn and winter clothes – no great mystery  :-)

    #11174
    Anonymous
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    • Super Star
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    Katsura, the one and only time I went there, clothing was divided up into men’s, ladies’, and children’s. The adults’ sections were quite extensive. There was also a section for shoes. This time there will be a section for toys and christmas decorations. It’s a bit better than a jumble sale. Jackets, coats and trousers are all on hangars, and items are priced individually. Jumpers and shirts etc were folded and displayed on a long table, although inevitably they are picked up then replaced unfolded. If I was to compare it with anything I would say it was set out like an Oxfam shop, but on a much larger scale. Prices probably compare as well, although I can’t speak from experience. Haven’t been in Oxfam for many years. The big difference is that the money goes to the individual sellers, who pay a small fee when they register.

    The organisers, Association Familiale du Mortainais, ask for all items of clothing be clean and free of tears. The selection  was quite good.

    If you just want fabric I don’t think it is the place for you.

    If I don’t sell the biker stuff it will go on leboncoin as you suggest.

    Que si, the Mortain bourse is also described as automne-hiver, with the next one being printemps-été. They ask for clothes that match the season. I suspect that the Avranches event will be the same as the Mortain one.

    #11210
    Katsura
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    Thanks, JD. I may take a look – I do patchwork and quilting so the back and front of a shirt, for eg, gives me a useable amount of fabric and can sometimes be good value.

    #11305
    Anonymous
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    Thanks JD -you have saved me a wasted trip to Avranches. I had rather hoped the absence of the word vetement indicated that it was something more exciting. Clothes shopping is the last thing on my list of  enjoyable days out.

    #11317
    Anonymous
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    <p style=”text-align: left;”>My pleasure,Que Si.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Not much French happening at the moment, which is what this thread is about. I think there are three camps. Those who can speak the language, those who are keen to learn and  try, and those who can’t see the point.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>The first group don’t need any help from me – in fact they may even be able to help me. I’m always happy to help the second group. As for the third group, I can only assume that they are happy to pay for translations as and when required.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>It’s strange that in the middle group, the people who I have found to be the most enthusiastic, regularly asking me for explanations, are owners of maisons secondaires – they don’t live here permanently but are keen to learn the language.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Does anyone have problems that they struggle with. For me it’s the could, should, would and would have verbs. I listen to the CD over and over and it all seems so clear, then I get into a real situation and it becomes murky.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”></p>

    #11323
    Stinky
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    JD, tenses mess with my mind also. People understand what I am trying to say, but I mentally cringe thinking what I might have said.

    #11356
    Anonymous
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    Why is my last post full of code?

    I remember some years ago someone telling how he asked a couple he was staying with if he could kiss their daughter. Nothing improper, just the traditional bizou. The French couple looked horrified until it was realised what had happened. The verb used, as found in a dictionary, had a totally different meaning in common usage.

     

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